Veterinary Services for Canines (dogs)

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Puppy (up to 1 year)

Exam with Vaccinations

The physical exam allows the veterinarian to inspect the puppy from head to tail, but in particular to identify congenital defects, check for hernias and look in the mouth. We want to inform you of anything that may be related to the health of your new puppy.

Core vaccinations:
Distemper
   -Vaccine combination protecting against canine distemper virus, parvovirus, +/- adenovirus, +/- parainfluenza, and +/- leptospirosis
   -Starting age for administration is usually 8 weeks
   -Vaccine boostered 1-to-2 additional times, 3-to-4 weeks apart
Rabies
   -Must be a certain age to receive first dose
   -Vaccine given once; first booster in 1-year

Other beneficial vaccinations:
Bordetella (kennel cough)
   -Protects against and helps reduce the severity of a contagious respiratory disease
   -Booster yearly
Lymes
   -Disease transmitted by ticks
   -First vaccine is followed by a booster in 2-3 weeks
   -Subsequent boosters are yearly
Canine influenza
   -First vaccine followed by a booster in 2-4 weeks
   -Subsequent boosters are yearly

Deworming

Puppies should be dewormed regularly to prevent infection from roundworms and hookworms, which are commonly found in these young animals. Other gastrointestinal parasites are possible as well, so a fecal sample may be required to diagnose the cause of abnormal feces.

Nutrition

Growth requirements are different for growing puppies compared to adults. Puppies should be fed a diet formulated for the puppy life stage.

Spay/neuter

Spaying and neutering will reduce undesirable behavior, unwanted pregnancies, and potentially fatal uterine infections. Spaying females before their first heat cycle will drastically reduce the risk of developing mammary tumors in the future.

Umbilical & inguinal hernia surgery

Developmental defects in the body wall may be present in some puppies, leading to herniation of internal tissue.  Depending on the size of the defect, surgery may be recommended to prevent future complications.

Other

  • Microchipping
  • Heartworm prevention (Heartworm test in addition if greater than 6 months of age)
  • Ectoparasite treatment/prevention (flea, tick, mites, demodex)
  • Parvovirus testing
  • Fecal examination
  • Wellness exams
  • Tuff Lock collars & leashes (100% lifetime guarantee)

Young Adult Dog (age 1 to 6 years)

Exam with Vaccinations

The physical examination allows the veterinarian to observe different bodily systems (cardiovascular, integument (skin, ears), gastrointestinal tract, etc), assess the body condition of your pet, and gives the veterinarian a chance to learn about the lifestyle of your pet.

Core vaccinations:

Distemper
   -Vaccine combination protecting against canine distemper virus, adenovirus, parvovirus, parainfluenza, and +/- leptospirosis
   -Booster yearly
Rabies
   -Booster first vaccination in 1 year
   -With documented proof of previous and properly timed Rabies vaccine administration, subsequent vaccine boosters are to occur within 3 years of the last vaccination, but may need to be re-dosed sooner if exposed to or bitten by another Rabies-status unknown animal

Other beneficial vaccinations:

Bordetella (kennel cough)
   -Protects against and helps reduce the severity of a contagious respiratory disease
   -May be required if you board your pet at a boarding facility
   -Booster yearly
Lymes
   -Disease transmitted by ticks
   -Booster yearly
Canine influenza
   -Booster yearly

Deworming

If your dog is not on heartworm prevention, our recommendation is for your dog to be dewormed at the same time as their yearly exam with vaccination boosters.

Nutrition

The lifestyle and activity level of your dog will help to determine the type of nutrition needed to provide sufficient energy for your pet. Maintenance requirements are based on body weight; added exercise/training or reproductive functions will increase the minimum energy requirement. For many dogs, a maintenance diet will meet their energy requirements. Obesity can predispose to several diseases, so keeping your pet at an ideal body weight is beneficial for overall health.

Dental care

Periodontal disease is among the most common diseases found in pets today. Periodontal disease starts as gingivitis, and will progress to involve the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone which work to hold the tooth inside the skull. Severely affected animals may be hesitant to eat and/or may develop local complications of the nose or eye. In addition, the bacteria that accumulates on the teeth (calculus/tartar) may leak into the bloodstream and travel to around the body, causing further damage to multiple organs (kidneys, liver, and heart).

Our dental care is performed under general anesthesia and includes assessing the degree of periodontal disease, mobility of teeth, gingival recession, cleaning and polishing. When indicated, we may also extract teeth due to pathologic mobility, tooth root resorptions, or furcation between roots of a multi-rooted tooth.

Diagnostics

  • Bloodwork (complete blood count, blood profile)
  • Internal imaging (radiography/x-ray, ultrasound)
  • Cytology (ear infections, skin masses, tissue imprints)
  • Heartworm test
  • Fine needle aspirate
  • Urinalysis
  • Allergy testing

Ectoparasite treatment / prevention

  • Fleas
  • Ticks
  • Mites

Mature Adult Dog (age 7 to 10 years)

Exam with Vaccinations

An annual exam allows a veterinarian to take a thorough look at your dog and note evidence of disease processes that hinder the health of your pet. Lumps and bumps, soreness of joints, and palpation of internal organs are especially noted in this age group.

Core vaccinations:

Distemper
   -Vaccine combination protecting against canine distemper virus, adenovirus, parvovirus, parainfluenza, and +/- leptospirosis
   -Booster yearly
Rabies
   -With documented proof of previous and properly timed Rabies vaccine administration, subsequent vaccine boosters are to occur within 3 years of the last vaccination, but may need to be re-dosed sooner if exposed to or bitten by another Rabies-status unknown animal

Other beneficial vaccinations:

Bordetella (kennel cough)
   -Protects against and helps reduce the severity of a contagious respiratory disease
   -May be required if you board your pet at a boarding facility
   -Booster yearly
Lymes
   -Disease transmitted by ticks
   -Booster yearly
Canine influenza
   -Booster yearly

Deworming

If your dog is not on heartworm prevention, our recommendation is for your dog to be dewormed at the same time as their yearly exam with vaccination boosters.

Nutrition

The lifestyle and activity level of your dog will help to determine the type of nutrition needed to provide sufficient energy for your pet. In addition any health issues or organ dysfunctions may require a change in diet requirements.

Some examples of health-related considerations are as follows:

  • Kidney dysfunction
  • Joint supplement
  • Increased fiber for diabetic patients
  • Bladder stones

Dental care

Periodontal disease is among the most common diseases found in pets today. Periodontal disease starts as gingivitis, and will progress to involve the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone which work to hold the tooth inside the skull. Severely affected animals may be hesitant to eat and/or may develop local complications of the nose or eye. In addition, the bacteria that accumulates on the teeth (calculus/tartar) may leak into the bloodstream and travel to around the body, causing further damage to multiple organs (kidneys, liver, and heart).

Our dental care is performed under general anesthesia and includes assessing the degree of periodontal disease, mobility of teeth, gingival recession, cleaning and polishing. When indicated, we may also extract teeth due to pathologic mobility, tooth root resorptions, or furcation between roots of a multi-rooted tooth.

Diagnostics

  • Bloodwork (complete blood count, blood profile)
  • Internal imaging (radiography/x-ray, ultrasound)
  • Cytology (ear infections, skin masses, tissue imprints)
  • Heartworm test
  • Fine needle aspirate
  • Urinalysis

Ectoparasite treatment / prevention

  • Fleas
  • Ticks
  • Mites

Senior Dog (age 11+ years)

Exam with vaccinations

An annual exam allows a veterinarian to take a thorough look at your dog and note evidence of disease processes that hinder the health of your pet. Lumps and bumps, soreness of joints, and palpation of internal organs are especially noted in this age group.

Core vaccinations:

Distemper
   -Vaccine combination protecting against canine distemper virus, adenovirus, parvovirus, parainfluenza, and +/- leptospirosis
   -Booster yearly
Rabies
   -With documented proof of previous and properly timed Rabies vaccine administration, subsequent vaccine boosters are to occur within 3 years of the last vaccination, but may need to be re-dosed sooner if exposed to or bitten by another Rabies-status unknown animal

Other beneficial vaccinations:

Bordetella (kennel cough)
   -Protects against and helps reduce the severity of a contagious respiratory disease
   -May be required if you board your pet at a boarding facility
   -Booster yearly
Lymes
   -Disease transmitted by ticks
   -Booster yearly
Canine influenza
   -Booster yearly

Deworming

If your dog is not on heartworm prevention, our recommendation is for your dog to be dewormed at the same time as their yearly exam with vaccination boosters.

Nutrition

Diets for geriatric patients should be calorie dense with easily digestible nutrients. More reluctance to move due to joint discomfort, unresolved oral pain, or systemic illness causing inappetance may be contributing factors for your older pet. Specialized diet formulations may be best for your dog.

Dental Care

Periodontal disease is among the most common diseases found in pets today. Periodontal disease starts as gingivitis, and will progress to involve the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone which work to hold the tooth inside the skull. Severely affected animals may be hesitant to eat and/or may develop local complications of the nose or eye. In addition, the bacteria that accumulates on the teeth (calculus/tartar) may leak into the bloodstream and travel to around the body, causing further damage to multiple organs (kidneys, liver, and heart).

Our dental care is performed under general anesthesia and includes assessing the degree of periodontal disease, mobility of teeth, gingival recession, cleaning and polishing. When indicated, we may also extract teeth due to pathologic mobility, tooth root resorptions, or furcation between roots of a multi-rooted tooth.

Diagnostics

-Bloodwork (complete blood count, blood profile)
-Internal imaging (radiography/x-ray, ultrasound)
-Cytology (ear infections, skin masses, tissue imprints)
-Heartworm test
-Fine needle aspirate
-Urinalysis

Euthanasia services

When the quality of life for a pet is determined to be too poor or a terminal illness prognosis is given, we can provide humane euthanasia. Owners may elect to remain present for the procedure if they wish. The bodily remains may be taken home with the owner, or we can dispose of the remains with the option of having cremation ashes returned to the owner.

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